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Five Elements Exhibit & Performance at Road to Asia Festival 2011 April 21, 2012

Posted by KDA in art, Canadian Tibetan Artist, Chuba, Chuba, Contemporary Tibetan Art, Contemporary Tibetan Artist, culture, Fashion, Heritage, Musical Performances, Public event, Tibetan art, Tibetan art exhibit, Tibetan Arts and Culture, Tibetan Chuba, Tibetan Clothing, Tibetan Culture, Tibetan Designer, Tibetan Designs, Tibetan Dress, Tibetan Heritage, Tibetan Photographer, Toronto Tibetan artist, traditions.
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At the JCCC’s 11th Road to Asia weekend festival on Sunday November 6, DreBu presented a Tibetan musical performance on main stage showcasing the beautiful five elements Chuba collection. The dance was choreographed by musician/performance artist Tseten and designer/artist Kalsang . The performance team also included 4 youth who worked hard at mastering the steps through a few rehearsal sessions. The outcome was a wonderful performance to an audience of over 300 people. The Five Elements  Collection was  exhibited at the Heritage Display for a month in November. Road to Asia festival weekend was visited by over 300o people. Introduction to the Tibetan performance was made by Gelek, co-founder of Drebu. Our dedicated volunteers at the event were Jamyang Dorjee and Cindy Laparra. Thank you to all our performers and volunteers! To view picture album on facebook, click here. To watch the video of the performance, visit here.

Enjoy the pictures below:

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Copyrights for all contents  2009-2016 DreBu. All rights reserved.

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DreBu showcases Tibetan art and performance at Road to Asia 2010 February 27, 2011

Posted by KDA in art, culture, free, Musical Performances, Public event, Tibetan art, Tibetan Arts and Culture, Tibetan Food, traditions, Uncategorized.
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Over 3000 people from all over GTA enjoyed Road to Asia 2010 festival during its 10th anniversary weekend on Nov 6th and 7th . DreBu was happy to be part of  the best of Asian cultures sharing our traditions and arts through music, performance and food.

Tsetan Lhudrup was the featured performing artist for the Tibetan cultural music and dance; he performed a couple of popular songs on his dranyen.

DreBu organized an art demonstration using  a cyclindrical pillar-like model (paper board material) where Tibetan architectural and  colorful motifs are put up with  sculptural clay material using the art of Tibetan butter sculpture known as “KarGyen” in Tibetan. Throughout the festival weekend, Ngawang and Kalsang worked on it from scratch; drawing the design sketch first and then laying and filling them out with the colorful clay. The completed peice will be displayed in 2011.

DreBu sold Tibetan momos and noodles to raise funds in order to meet with the participation expenses to pay our artists and performers. The participants were appreciative of the authentic taste of the beef and vegetarian dumplings!

DreBu believes in supporting our professional artists by compensating for their works which encourages them to continue to work in their artistic skills and to pass on the knowledge through sharing with the younger generation members of the communities and the  public at large.

We would like to thank Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre for hosting such an important and wonderful cultural festival which is apolitical by nature and open to all Asian cultures for fostering sharing/collaboration of our artistic traditions contributing to the diversity of Canada and the world. And special thanks to Christine Takasaki for being such an untiring and gracious co-ordinator of this annual event. (photo with Christine!)

Last but not the least, DreBu thank all the volunteers to make our participation at the 10th Road to Asia a success!  Thank you to Jamyang Dorjee, Lobsang Rapten, Norbu Samten Naftel, Tenzin Pelmo, Tenzin Namsel, Norbu Dhundup and Tsering Dickyi.

We look forward to coming back in 2011 with a surprise presentation.

Copyright 2009-2011, DreBu. All rights reserved.

Asian Heritage Month: Tibetan Performance “DraNyen Shabdro” in Parkdale June 26, 2010

Posted by elzilcho in Musical Performances, Public event, Tibetan Arts and Culture.
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On Saturday, May 15, Drebu organized a special presentation of Tibetan music, dance and youth breakdancing to commemorate the national Asian Heritage Month in May. This annual event is sponsored by Toronto Public Library all across the GTA. The event in Parkdale was held in Parkdale Public Library since this community is a major Tibetan hub in North America. This was also the first free public Tibetan musical performance arranged by the library. The hour-long event started at 2 pm, and was attended by nearly 80 people.

Kushog Ngawang la

Kushog (Tibetan for monk) Ngawang la recited a prayer called “Mani Monlam”, using the Buddhist ritual instruments Drilbu and Damaru (a bell and a hand-held miniature drum-like instrument). The Drilbu and Damaru’s sound represent the speech/teachings aspect of an enlightened mind to help dispel bad energy while bringing in positive vibes and peace of mind. The prayer was dedicated to universal harmony and to those who suffered in the tragic earthquakes in Haiti and Tibet.

Break dancing youth

Two Parkdale youth, Vinoth and Norbu, performed a break dance routine to Asian beats.

Tseten performing his Dramnyen

Tsetan la, a master traditional Tibetan musician who graduated from the Tibetan Performing Arts Centre in Dharamsala, India, performed three songs on his “Dramnye”, a traditional Tibetan string instrument. This style of performance is also called, “Dramnye Shabdro” meaning “dancing to the sweet and melodious sound”. The first song was titled, “Kalpa Sang So”: a song calling us to remember our past generations and their contributions. He also performed a traditional Western Tibetan song, “BangZoe”: a song about identifying the real treasures in our lives. The last song was, “Dolma Lhakhang” in dedication to the female Buddha and Protectress.

Tibetan Dancers

Two young female performing artists, Tenzin Choekyi and Sonam Choekyi, presented two dances. One demonstrating the lives of farmers working in the fields and another on appreciating nature.

The event concluded with light snacks and refreshments.

All performers received a modest honorarium offered by Toronto Public Library in appreciation for sharing our culture and taking part in keeping the diverse Canadian culture dynamic and thriving.

Thank you to Miranda Huska, Parkdale Library Branch Head in initiating this program. Thank you to Dolkar and Kalsang in volunteering as the gracious ushers for the event. Thank you to Kalden for being the DJ of breakdancing.

Drebu would also like to thank all the performers and the attendants who came out in support of the event to celebrate Tibetan Culture and Asian Heritage as part of Canada!

Drebu organizers with some of the participants and supporters

Kalsang Dolma, Co-founder and Director

Gelek Badheytsang, Co-founder and Director

Copyright DreBu 2010 – 2011. All rights reserved.

Drebu at the Road to Asia Festival, 2009 November 26, 2009

Posted by KDA in Musical Performances, Public event, Tibetan Arts and Culture.
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On Nov. 7 and 8, Drebu participated in the annual Road to Asia Festival hosted by and at the Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre in Toronto.

Kalsang introduces the Tibetan monks at the Road to Asia festival

Kalsang introduces the Tibetan monks at the Road to Asia festival

The festival featured a wide range of Asian cultural performances, artifacts and food: Japan, China, Taiwan, Malaysia, Indonesia, India, Vietnam, Pakistan and Tibet.

Drebu introduced the Tibetan acts for the two-day festival. On Saturday, Nov. 7, Mingmar Tsering performed Tibetan traditional folk songs singing, and playing the dranyen (Tibetan guitar) and flute on two different stage times.

Mingmar, Tibetan singer

Mingmar performs with the dranyen

The following Sunday, Nov. 8, we featured Tibetan monks on two separate acts. The first act featured three monks reciting “Kyamdro (refuge), Nyense (invitation) and Ngowa (dedication)”. The second act involved a monk invoking Padmasambhava for world peace.

Tibetan monks at the Road to Asia festival 2009

Tibetan monks at the Road to Asia festival 2009

The monks are: Lobsang Gawa, Jampa Tsering and Ngawang Rabjor Lama.

Throughout the two-day Road to Asia festival Drebu featured a Tibetan painter at the children’s area. Tenpa, who studied in India, painted traditional Tibetan sketches which many children and adults delightfully coloured and filled. He guided them along the process and enjoyed the experience of presenting Tibetan art at the festival.

Tenpa at the JCCC

Tenpa with a young budding artist

All of the festival participants were offered an honorarium by Drebu as a recognition and appreciation for their contribution in helping promote Tibetan arts and culture in Toronto.

We thank all our sponsors for their support, and to JCCC for inviting us to participate in this wonderful and fun festival. Our sponsors are listed in the previous blog post.

Please enjoy the photographs of the event displayed on the right.

Notice the Tibetan flag on the far left (one of four flags featured at the festival!)

Notice the Tibetan flag on the far left (one of four flags featured at the festival!)

Copyright 2009-2010 Drebu: All rights reserved.